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15 Minute Leftover Bulgogi Korean Fried Rice

Reducing food waste by repurposing our bulgogi leftovers into a very flavorful and delicious bulgogi Korean fried rice. The tender Gochujang marinated beef and onions work perfectly with the fluffy leftover rice. And if you’ve got leftover kimchi, you can add that as well!

 

A dark grey bowl with fried rice and a runny poached egg on top.

 

Usually, we eat all of the bulgogi we make. However, this time I made the same amount but there were fewer people around the table to actually eat it. I found myself with some leftovers, and it was quite easy to see what needed to be done!

 

Other ways to use cooked rice

 

I love my fried rice and I have made one Chinese style fried rice with sesame, scallions and ginger, and one Mexican style fried rice with turmeric and chipotle. Both are made with leftover cooked rice. It is such a great way to use that rice, because I always tend to cook too much rice. 

 

Apparently I’m inspired by countries when I make fried rice recipes, so please let me know if there’s another country you would want to see next!

 

Close-up of the skillet with beef bulgogi fried rice.

 

30 minute or less-dinners

 

All the fried rice recipes are made in less than 30 minutes. Sometimes we love it quick and easy, right? And if it’s not rice, it’s noodles. Those are also quick, like this vegetarian lo mein, ginger sesame fried noodles or pork stir fry.

 

Like noodles, like pasta, this rosemary chicken pasta is also on the table in 25 minutes. And soups are also often quick, they can take a long time but if you want it quick you can make it quick! Like this tomato white bean soup. Using store-bought or pre-made pita bread, these serrano mozzarella pita pizzas can be done in about 15 minutes.

 

How to handle leftover rice

 

To make fried rice, you definitely need to start with already cooked rice. Using freshly cooked rice will not have the same effect as day-old cooked rice. Just make sure your rice has been in the refrigerator, because cooked rice shouldn’t stay in room temperature for more than an hour

 

Uncooked rice can contain spores of Bacillus cereus, which is a bacteria that can cause food poisoning. This bacteria can survive even after the rice has been cooked, and the longer the cooked rice sits on the counter, the greater the chances that this bacteria has multiplied and potentially produce toxins. 

 

So to summarize; once your cooked rice has cooled and within an hour (maximum 2), add it straight to the refrigerator in a box with a tight lid. This also applies for re-heated rice (as in this bulgogi Korean fried rice).

 

Copper skillet with fried rice.

 

More fried rice tips

 

If you want to cook rice the same day as you’re having fried rice, it is possible. Rinse your rice in cold water before cooking it to rinse off some of the starch. This will help avoid the rice to clump together. Cook your rice as according to package instructions and once done, still covered, let it rest for 5 minutes before fluffing it with a fork.

 

Now you need to let it cool, and  I would therefore pour all the rice over to a large plate or baking sheet to let the moisture evaporate. This too will help the rice to not clump together. Once completely cold, you can proceed with the recipe.

 

It’s also a good idea to chop all the vegetables and cooked meat beforehand, because making fried rice is a super quick process. Another tip is to use a large skillet with high heat to wok the vegetables quickly without overcooking them. 

 

Skillet with bulgogi Korean fried rice. Flatlay.

 

How to poach an egg

 

All fried rice needs eggs. I usually crack eggs directly into the fried rice, but decided I wanted it a little different for this Korean fried rice and poaching eggs instead. 

 

Boil water and add 1 tbsp of white vinegar to it and crack your egg into a fine mesh sieve over a small bowl. This way the thinner egg white won’t give you those weird egg white feathers. Fresher eggs have less liquidy white, so I would definitely opt for fresh eggs!

 

Once the water is boiling, swirl the water to make a vortex and slowly pour the egg into the center (don’t make a vortex if you’re poaching several eggs at once). Boil for 3 minutes for that runny yolk. Take it out and pat dry with a paper towel and season with salt and pepper if desired.

 

Hand taking a fork into the runny poached egg over fried rice.

 

How to make it

 

To make leftover bulgogi Korean fried rice, first you need leftover bulgogi and leftover cooked rice. In a large skillet on high heat, add chopped leftover bulgogi and carrot matchsticks and cook for 7 minutes or until carrots are soft-ish. This is also when to add leftover chopped kimchi, if desired.

 

Add cold, cooked rice and combine well. Next add in frozen peas, onion powder, soy sauce and Gochujang. Cook for a few minutes, or until rice is heated through. Right before serving, add in sesame oil, sesame seeds and cilantro.

 

Serve each bowl with a poached or sunny-side up egg. Enjoy!

 

Small skillet with fried rice garnished with sliced red chilli.

 

Did you like this leftover rice recipe? Here’s more ‘leftover’ ideas I think you will like:

 

 

I’d love to hear your thoughts. Comment below or tag me @thegingerwithspice on Instagram. And don’t forget to Pin it for later! To make sure you’re never missing another recipe, please feel free to subscribe to my newsletter. As a thanks you will receive a free e-cookbook Travels Through the Seasons, with many delicious recipes from around the world that suit different seasons of the year. 

 

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A dark grey bowl with fried rice and a runny poached egg on top.

15 Minute Leftover Bulgogi Korean Fried Rice

Yield: 4 people
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

Reducing food waste by repurposing our bulgogi leftovers into a very flavorful bulgogi Korean fried rice, also great with leftover kimchi!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chopped leftover bulgogi, 130g, less is also fine
  • 1 carrot, cut into matchsticks
  • 1/4 cup chopped kimchi, 40g optional
  • 3 cups cooked rice, 600g
  • 1/3 cup frozen peas, 40g
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp Gochujang, or other chilli paste
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
  • handful chopped cilantro
  • 4 eggs, poached or sunny-side up, optional

Instructions

  1. In a large skillet on high heat, add chopped leftover bulgogi, carrot matchsticks, and kimchi if using, and cook for 7 minutes or until carrots are soft-ish.
  2. Add cooked rice and combine well. Next add in frozen peas, onion powder, soy sauce and Gochujang. Cook for a few minutes, or until rice is heated through.
  3. Right before serving, add in sesame oil, sesame seeds and cilantro. Serve each bowl with a poached or sunny-side up egg.

Notes

Recipe for Korean beef bulgogi

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: ca 1 cup
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 340Total Fat: 10.5gSaturated Fat: 2.4gTrans Fat: 0gCholesterol: 167mgSodium: 353mgCarbohydrates: 49.3gFiber: 1.7gSugar: 3.5gProtein: 11.9g

Nutrition information isn't always accurate, estimate for informational purposes only.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or tag @thegingerwithspice on Instagram, I'd love to see!

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