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Homemade Za’atar Spice Blend

 

Za’atar is a Middle Eastern spice blend consisting of aromatic and sour sumac, fragrant thyme, sesame seeds, and salt. It’s easy, it’s delicious. It is a spice blend that is perfect with anything bread, but can be used with so much more!

 

Homemade Za'atar Spice Blend

 

 

 

 

 

Homemade Za'atar Spice Blend

 

So – I didn’t like thyme before. I think the problem was that I tasted it in an omelet when I was a kid, and I like my eggs a certain way, very particular about that. And thyme just did not go with omelettes. Sorry, if that’s your thing. So I just always thought I didn’t like thyme.

 

Homemade Za'atar Spice Blend

 

But I do now, fortunately. I figured I was missing out, I made an Italian seasoning which also had thyme, and it was so delicious. When I found the za’atar recipe, I thought to myself that this too had to be yummy. Aand I was right!

 

Homemade Za’atar Spice Blend

 

This recipe is adapted from Genius Kitchen. Place all the ingredients – sumac, thyme, sesame seeds, Pink Himalayan Sea Salt – into a spice grinder and grind until powder form. Store in an airtight container. People always give such short ‘expiration date’ on things, and this is no exception.

 

I made za’atar in January and – guess what – still fragrant and yummy (Note; I wrote this in May). The only thing that can happen is that it will be less fragrant, but it hasn’t been my experience. Don’t throw it away just because it has passed its 2 weeks of life.

 

Homemade Za'atar Spice Blend

 

And if you don’t have a spice grinder (looking at you, sis), place the ingredients in a plastic bag and bang your frustration out on it. It probably won’t be as fine a powder as in a spice grinder, but who cares, it tastes amazing nonetheless.

 

I like to spread it with a tiny bit of olive oil on bread, be it naan, pizza or even croissants! I haven’t tried it on croissants yet, but I saw it in a croissant recipe the other day and I have to say I am intrigued. Recipes where I use za’atar will come up shortly, so just stay tuned for that.

 

I also use za’atar in these ham and cheese pita pizzas, for the vegetables in this crispy baked falafel, and in this harissa chicken and butternut squash.

 

Homemade Za'atar Spice Blend

 

Do you like za’atar? Here’s other spice blends I think you’ll like:

 

Hope you like it and find uses for it! If you have any interesting uses for it, or other feedback, I’d love to hear from you – either in the comment section below, or tag me @thegingerwithspice on Instagram. And don’t forget to Pin it for later!

 

 

In order to keep the blog up and running this post contains affiliate links, it will be at no extra cost to you, please read the disclosure for more information.

 

Homemade Za'atar Spice Blend

Za'atar is a Middle Eastern spice blend consisting of aromatic and sour sumac, fragrant thyme, sesame seeds, and salt. It's easy, it's delicious. 
Prep Time2 mins
Total Time2 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Middle Eastern
Calories:

Ingredients

  • 120 ml dried thyme 1/2 cup
  • 4 tbsp sumac 1/4 cup
  • 2 tbsp sesame seeds
  • 1 tsp Pink Himalayan Sea Salt can use regular sea salt

Instructions

  • Place all the ingredients - sumac, thyme, sesame seeds, Pink Himalayan Sea Salt - into a spice grinder* and grind until powder form.
  • Store in an airtight container.**

Notes

* And if you don't have a spice grinder, place the ingredients in a plastic bag and bang it with something hard, e.g. a rolling pin. It probably won't be as fine a powder as in a spice grinder, but still very tasty.
** People always give such short 'expiration date' on things, and this is no exception. I made za'atar 4 months ago and - guess what - still fragrant and yummy. The only thing that can happen is that it will be less fragrant, but it hasn't been my experience. Don't throw it away just because it has passed its 2 weeks of life.
Did you make it? Tag @thegingerwithspice on Instagram, I'd love to see!
Author: Stine Mari from Ginger with Spice
Adapted from: Genius Kitchen
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Linda | Brunch-n-Bites

Saturday 12th of May 2018

How wonderful! I love the smell of za-atar and never thought the combination is so simple but flavorful.

Stine Mari | Ginger with Spice

Saturday 12th of May 2018

Thank you! I know right, me neither! So easy, but so tasty too.

Lisa

Wednesday 9th of May 2018

Your pictures are so gorgeous and this spice mix sounds amazing!

Stine Mari | Ginger with Spice

Wednesday 9th of May 2018

Thank you so much, Lisa!

Stephanie

Wednesday 9th of May 2018

This sounds yummy and it's so easy to make! Your photos are gorgeous as well!

Stine Mari | Ginger with Spice

Wednesday 9th of May 2018

Thank you so much, dear!

camila

Tuesday 8th of May 2018

za'aatar is my favorite!! I just bought some because I made labneh the other day, but once my container is finished I'm going to follow your recipe and make my own blend!

Stine Mari | Ginger with Spice

Wednesday 9th of May 2018

Labneh is definitely next on my Middle Eastern to-do list! I hope you'll like this blend too, Camila :)

Chef Mireille

Tuesday 8th of May 2018

Im lucky to live near a Middle Eastern area where I can get freshly blended Za'atar, Raz el Hanout and others but this is an easy recipe to follow as I know some aren't so lucky to live near an area like this.

Stine Mari | Ginger with Spice

Wednesday 9th of May 2018

I wish that was me! I love Middle Eastern food, but it's often very difficult to find the ingredients here. I've spent months looking for edible rose petals for ras el hanout, and I still haven't found it (not many ship to Norway, and if they do the customs tend to stop them). Soo I'll have to look for it when I'm traveling!

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